Archive for June, 2011

Days of monsters

Posted: 24/06/2011 in Un poco de todo


Divertido homenaje flash a rampage modernizado…

Mooola

Posted: 21/06/2011 in Un poco de todo


cuando me toque la loteria me instalo uno…

Sombrasyceniza desmonta los 10 mitos de pelicula que mas rabia le dan acerca de las espadas y armaduras medievales.

Aunque aun quedarian muchos mas para hacer un tercera y cuarta parte de la serie…

Efecto secundario

Posted: 18/06/2011 in Un poco de todo

curiosear por internet tiene siempre un efecto: ver tetas. Y, secundariamente, encontrar información que NO necesitabas

– Vicisitud y sordidez

Problem?

Posted: 18/06/2011 in Un poco de todo

dont feed the troll…

No esta muerto el que cae, solo esta muerto el que no se levanta

[…]
Roll up your sleeves, and bring all your creativity and meaningful skills to bear on the problem of building something.

This is what the world requires – this is what the world rewards. Not just calling yourself creative, but understanding how to exercise your creative powers to some end, to bring your vision and skills together in a meaningful way. This is a powerful thing to be able to do. It gives you tremendous value in a society where attention is currency – being able to capture people’s imaginations is the scarcest kind of power in a fractured culture. Creating work that transports and transcends is one of the few ways to create sustainable value in a disposable society. What you do, if you do it well, is never going to be a commodity. Vision, magic, delight. Heart-rocking spectacle. Pulse-pounding action. These things don’t get outsourced to some cubicle drone in the developing world.
[…]
this is what it means to be a creative professional: figuring out how to be the best steward of your gifts, so that your power to create grows and deepens meaningfully over time. So that your edges stay sharp, and your light stays bright. The life you’ve chosen is not one that simply requires clocking in and clocking out. You’ve got to bring your soul to it every day. You’ve got to be on your game.

That takes discipline. And it takes awareness – of how you’re spending your time, and of how what you’re doing affects your capability and your capacity. You are going to have to ask yourself, at every turn: is this project making me smarter, or making me stupider. Is this job stoking my fire, or burning me out? How do I top this? How can I learn from this? How do I produce my best work in this kind of environment? Should my next set of projects build up from what I’ve already done? Or do I need to branch out, go sideways, and push myself to try something new, that I’m less comfortable with.
[…]
Think carefully about how you spend your time, because your work isn’t like other people’s work. There isn’t a hard line between uptime and downtime. Your brain is always working, and what you experience in your downtime influences the quality of what you do when you’re on task. Be mindful of what you’re getting out of the time that you spend. Does your downtime refresh and recharge you? Or does it narcotize you? Does it spark new ideas? Or do you find yourself thinking, “well, there’s three hours of my life I’m never getting back.”
[…]
Habits are powerful – people don’t realize how powerful habits are, and how much of their success or lack of success in life is attributable to sheer habit. Be aware of your habits, and what is turning in from an occasional to a regular thing, and what are the regular things that you don’t even think about any more, because they are so habitual that they have become invisible. Down to the very basics: how much and when do you sleep, what you eat, how you sit, whether you walk or bike or drive. When and where do you get your best ideas? What sorts of activities and conversations leave you feeling happier and smarter? What do you continually do that leaves you feeling demoralized. Be mindful of your habits. Make them intentional.
[…]
Getting stuck is a big part of creative work, and it’s really important to be good at getting unstuck. There are two main reasons why creative people get stuck on a piece of work: The first is, you don’t actually have an idea. You may have requirements, and you may have tools. But you don’t actually have an idea that’s going to carry the day, and you’re going to be stuck until you get a solid idea. The second reason creative people get stuck is that, while they have the idea, executing the idea takes a lot of work, and not all of that work is fun, and basically you don’t want to do the work, because having the idea in the first place was the fun part. The problem is, you don’t get to say “check mate in four.” You actually have to finish the project. So you get mystically “stuck” after the brilliant sketch is done.
[…]
It is very, very important to accurately understand which of these problems you’re having when you get stuck. If you don’t have an idea, you need to play around a little, take a walk, have a good conversation, open the aperture. As they say in drawing class, explore the negative space. If you’re balking at the work, you need to stop playing around, sit down, shut up, go offline, and focus single-mindedly on executing the work, and make it real. In either case, if you try to solve one problem when you’re really having the other, you’re going to waste a lot of time.
[…]
When you do procrastinate, learn how to procrastinate productively.
[…]
Always have a side project that allows you to learn and express things differently than your main work.
[…]
As a creative professional, you have to get over the idea that your employer or your client owes you a wide blue sky or a creative romper room.
[…]
when you are talking dollars, realize one thing: Most people say that time is money. But for a creative professional, it’s exactly the opposite. Money is time.
[…]
Realize that “no’s” are good. Yesses are better, but maybes will kill you. The world is full of “maybe” people who want an infinite amount of research and specifications but won’t actually make a decision until something is inevitable. Push those people to say no – or to tell you exactly what they need to say yes.
[…]
Lastly, consider your portfolio – and your life – from the perspective of yourself at 80 years of age. When you don’t know what to do, picture your old-guy or old-lady self looking back on this moment and being proud of the work you did, or the decision you made, or how you conducted yourself. Picture yourself looking back, and don’t do something that old guy or old lady would regret, or be embarrassed about.